The Risks of Playing Football

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Football is a popular sport, and it’s played everywhere in the United States. 

There are many benefits to playing the game, but there are also many risks. Football can help players make heaps of money, but you can injure yourself while playing it. Not just a broken bone, but it can cause severe head concussions that could put you into life-threatening situations. 

Physical injuries in football happen in many different ways. The two main ways football players get injured are because of overuse and heat injuries. 

If you are continually tackling, running, and jumping, your body can get worn out. Tackling can injure your bones and muscles by making hard contact. 

According to the physical therapy site SimpleTherapy.com, “Knee injuries were the most common type of injury suffered by NFL players last year, accounting for more than 20 percent of all injuries.”

Another serious injury that you can suffer in football is CTE. It stands for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy. 

CTE is a progressive degenerative brain disease that occurs from multiple hits to the head. 

According to www.bu.edu, “Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive degenerative disease of the brain found in people with a history of repetitive brain trauma (often athletes), including symptomatic concussions as well as asymptomatic subconcussive hits to the head that do not cause symptoms.”

CTE can lead to severe long term issues of the brain. If a person has suffered many repetitive hits to the head while playing football, it can lead to memory loss, confusion, depression, and dementia.

We interviewed some students at HMS to see why they liked playing football and 8th-grade students Aiden Erickson, Andrew Dillon, and Owen Swartley all said they loved playing football. 

We asked them if they knew of any severe injuries that come with playing football, and Aiden and Owen both said, “Yes, concussions.” 

We informed them of what CTE was and many other injuries and asked them if they’d still want to play football. 

Owen said, “Yes, I am still going to play football because there is better technology.” 

Aiden also said, “Yes, because I enjoy playing it and catching the ball.”

According to our research and the people that we interviewed, there are many serious risks of playing football. 

Although there are risks that could become serious, most of the people we interviewed still wanted to play because it was a sport they enjoyed, and they were willing to get hurt doing something they liked.